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Voltage in vs out difference?

  • CaptKirk Saturday, July 01, 2017 2:44 AM Reply

    Hi, 


    Being a buck converter, the input voltage must be higher than the output.  What is the minimum voltage difference do you need to make this work.  For example, if I want to set it for 12v out, what is the minimum input voltage to get 12V?  will this work at 13v in to 12v out?  What is the lowest input voltage to allow the buck to regulate to the set voltage??  I will have a battery pack that runs from 16.8 volts down to 12v - at what voltage will this stop regulating?  Will it shut off, or just drop the output voltage lower?


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  • sheepish Top 10 Forum Poster Sunday, July 02, 2017 5:43 PM Reply

    SpecificationInput
    voltage: 4.5~30V input voltage do not exceed 30V; Output voltage
    :0.8~30V continuously adjustable (default output 5V); 0.8~30V fixed
    output;


    30 V in and out? That doesn't sound right.

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  • CaptKirk Saturday, July 08, 2017 1:55 AM Reply

    Well, it could be an ultra efficient buck converter that can support a 0v delta between in and out, but that would be something VERY special.  Normal regulators and most buck converters that I know of need a slight difference in voltage.  For example if the input MAX is 30v then the max OUTPUT voltage could only be 28.5 volts or something like that - typically .7 to 2.5 volts is the normal required delta.  I am asking what THIS product needs to regulate the output- how much difference in input V verses output V.



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    post edited by CaptKirk on 7/8/2017 at 1:56 AM
  • sheepish Top 10 Forum Poster Saturday, July 08, 2017 10:13 AM Reply

    an ultra efficient buck converter that can support a 0v delta between in and out, but that would be something VERY special.


    I would call something like that a buck-boost driver. @desolder?

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  • Maye_Tao @DX Staff @DX Staff Thursday, July 13, 2017 10:42 AM Reply

    @CaptKirk

    Voltage in vs out difference?

    0.5V

    e.g.  Output: 12V; When the input runs down to 12V, the output will be around 11.5V.

    Be happy. ( *^_^* )
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    mod edited by Maye_Tao on 7/13/2017 at 3:14 PM
  • sheepish Top 10 Forum Poster Thursday, July 13, 2017 10:46 AM Reply

    So the output voltage is 0.8~29.5 V?

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  • desolder Top 10 Forum Poster Friday, July 14, 2017 12:56 AM Reply

    Yep, any buck-boost converter will happily do a 0V input-output difference.

    What's up with the scrubbed LED driver IC markings?
    What are they trying to hide?

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